Jobs and Resources Available

Scholarship image_1

Check out the following work opportunities and resources available:

  • City Year is Hiring: Must by at least 17 years old,  a US Citizen or Permanent Resident. High School Seniors or Graduates only. Deadline is Tuesday, April 29 @ 3:30pm. Apply here.
  • Summer Job Opportunity: 2014 Summer Night Lights Program: Available to high school students and recent graduates. Click here to apply (see the website for deadlines).
  • Saturday Senior Project Paper Help: Need help with your Senior Paper? See Ms. Garcia for more information. She’ll be offering a special Senior Paper Workshop on Sat. 4/26 from 8:00am – 12:00pm.
  • Spring Fling Youth Resource Fair: Summer job employment, college counseling, health exams, and more. Food, games, live bands and Power 106! Click here for more info.
  • Community Services Unlimited Inc. Apprenticeships/Internships: Food/Urban Farming (Spring, Summer, and Fall). For students 17 years and up. Click here for more information and to apply. (Disregard the 2010 dates, an error).
  • Youth Air Fair: Interested in a job in the skies? Arts and Aviation Career Fair is on Saturday, May 3 from 10am-4pm. Click here for more information.

AP Language Essay Reading

essay

Have each section’s reading completed by the due dates marked in parentheses. Expect quizzes, discussions and writing assignments.

Textbook: The Bedford Reader (Eds. Kennedy, Kennedy and Aaron)

A. Women in Dialogue (Fri. 4/4)

  • Alice Walker, “Everyday Use” (267)
  • Fatema Mernissi, “Size 6: The Western Women’s Harem” (252)
  • Jessica Cohen, “Grade A: The Market for a Yale Women’s Eggs” (114)
  • Jamaica Kincaid, “Girl” (367)
  • Sandra Cisneros, “Only Daughter” (584)

B. Controversial Topics and Current Events (Mon. 4/7)

  • Anna Quindlen, “Homeless” (198)
  • Brent Staples, “Black Men and Public Space” (208)
  • Roger Rosenblatt, “We Are Free to Be You, Me, Stupid, and Dead” (215)
  • Kathy Pollitt, “What’s Wrong with Gay Marriage?” (548)
  • Charles Colson, “Gay ‘Marriage’: Societal Suicide” (554)
  • Edwidge Danticat, “Not Your Homeland” (572)

C. Race, Culture and Language (Wed. 4/9)

  • Maya Angelou, “Champion of the World” (93)
  • Amy Tan, “Fish Cheeks” (99)
  • Gloria Naylor, “The Meanings of a Word” (488)
  • Christine Leong, “Being a Chink” (494)
  • Dogoberto Glib, “Pride” (505)

D. Dark Humor and Satire (Fri. 4/11)

  • Shirley Jackson: “The Lottery” (123)
  • Sarah Vowell, “Shooting Dad”(154)
  • Robert Benchley, “My Face” (170)
  • Jessica Mitford, “Behind the Formaldehyde Curtain” (308)

To Kill A Mockingbird

to-kill-a-mockingbird

Novel Final Exam:

  • Thursday, 4/10 (Period 6)
  • Wednesday, 4/9 (Period 3)

Essay Questions:

  • Due Thursday, 4/10 (Period 6 at the beginning of the period!)
  • Due Wednesday, 4/9 (Period 3 at the beginning of the period!)
  1. Racism: “I’m simply defending a Negro—his name’s Tom Robinson” (100). With these words Atticus informs Scout of his life-altering task of standing up to the prejudice and racism that pervades the sleepy southern town that was Maycomb, Alabama in the 1930’s. Discuss the effects of racism on Maycomb citizens such as Tom and Helen Robinson, Calpurnia, Scout, Jem, Dill, or Mayella Ewell. Is this a challenging novel that promotes Civil Rights or does it accept the racism and segregation of the time period?
  2. Empathy: According to Atticus, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view – until you climb into his skin and walk around in it” (39). How is empathy toward others demonstrated or learned by characters such as Atticus, Scout, Jem, Dill, or Miss Maudie?
  3. Courage: Atticus says to Jem that he wants his son “to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand” (149). How is courage defined in this novel? What character(s) best exemplify courage? Why? What point does Harper Lee want to make about courage through her use of these characters?
  4. Loss of Innocence: With age and experience come knowledge, the realization of harsh realities, and finally wisdom and understanding. Trace the narrator’s journey from innocence to understanding in a thoughtful essay.

To download the essay handout and criteria/requirement, click here.

Helpful Resources: